Category Archives: Canada

We Will Remember Them

These images of metal markers in the shape of the maple leaf are located in Victorian Lawn Cemetery in St. Catharines, ON, Canada. The marker contains the official badge of the Canadian Legion and motto, “Memoriam eorum retinebimus”, We Will Remember Them.

19981821579_3e5a752018_z
Source: Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/57156785@N02/19545864284/in/photostream/

The markers are also holders for Canadian flags in commemoration of St. Catharine’s war veterans.

20142223556_a5a4aedebf_z

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/57156785@N02/19545864284/in/photostream/

19545864284_502fd1c314_z
Source: Source:https://www.flickr.com/photos/57156785@N02/19545864284/in/photostream/
19981899929_7181b5e4f9_z
Source: Source:https://www.flickr.com/photos/57156785@N02/19545864284/in/photostream/
Advertisements

Milton Evergreen

Location: Milton, Ontario, Canada

The first burial in Evergreen Cemetery took place in 1881, and the current 26 acre site contains over 8600 burials. Loved ones are commemorated with statues, trees and memorial benches.

An annual Remembrance Day service is held at the Cenotaph and Cairn on November 11th at 11:00 a.m. by the Milton Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion.

inside halton
Source: https://www.insidehalton.com/news-story/6933528-milton-remembrance-day-services-set/

Within the cemetery are numerous carvings on aging and diseased trees, and trees destroyed by storms. The wooden sculptures were done by chain saw and fine detail was chiseled by hand. After completion the trees were coated with a protective sealant.

In memory of / Solomon Giddings / 1866-1914 / At Rest

Milton_Evergreen_Giddings

Solomon Giddings was a quarryman/labourer who lived in Milton Heights and worked at the brick/limestone mills. He died at age of 49 from hepatitis.

He was married to Elizabeth Agnes Standen a member of the Anglican church, who died in 1946 at age 79 and is also interred in Milton Evergreen Cemetery. They had two daughters Emma and Gladys, and four sons Bert, Mark, Ernest and George.

Giddings Crescent in Milton was named after their son Bertie James Giddings from Milton Heights who was a private with the 164th Battalion of the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force during World War I. He enlisted in January 1916 and went to France in 1918. He was wounded in 1918 and lost an eye. Born in 1898, he died in 1974.

find a grave
Source: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/153960218/bertie-j-giddings

Land Donation

In the mid-1830s Roman Catholics emigrating from Ireland settled in the area of Acton, Ontario, Canada where the spiritual needs of the people were looked after by the Jesuit Fathers from Guelph.

From 1852 to 1857 infrequent Masses were held in the home of Matthew and Honora McCann until one day the floor gave way, resulting in some parishioners falling into the cellar. To prevent a recurrence, McCann and his neighbour John Mulholland decided to donate two acres of land to build a proper church (St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church) and cemetery. McCann and Mulholland are both buried here.

This small cemetery located in the countryside on Dublin Line contains many stones that are broken or illegible.

A map at the entrance to the cemetery identifies plots and the names of the deceased buried there.

St Joseph_Acton plan

Sleep on my dear in calm repose
Though parted now awhile
In yonder realm we’ll join to praise
And greet your happy smile. 1872

Location: St. Peter’s Mission, Roman Catholic Church, Trafalgar Township, 9th line, Milton, Ontario, Canada

st peter mission (6)

In 1823 a log church was built on this site to serve the Catholic Irish Immigrants who worked on the original Welland Canal. Some of these families are buried in the cemetery.

st peter mission (1)

There is beyond the sky / a Heaven of joy and love / Holy children when they die / Go to that world above.

The first interment was a 12 year old girl who died from pneumonia in the depth of winter in the year 1825. Her father, wanting her to be buried in consecrated ground, placed her body on a horse drawn sled and traveled south to Milton from Orangeville (approximately 50 miles).

st peter mission (3)

st peter mission (5)

In death’s cold lies sleeping here / A tender parent, a companion dear /In love she lived, in peace she died / Her life was asked but was denied.

st peter mission (2)

 

Triller Family

The Triller family was originally from Warren County, New Jersey, USA, and the family name was Driller. William Driller and his wife Mary (Maria) had 10 children. Sarah who was the 7th child and 5th daughter was born on 5 Dec 1790 in Knowlton Township, Warren Co. Her gravestone is located in Oakville, Ontario, Canada. Note that in the early 19th century, the years, months and days were recorded on gravestones. Her burial there in 1856 may be explained by the adventures of her elder brother, Philip, who is listed in the “Annals of the Forty”, No. 9 (1958), pp. 24-25.

Oakville_1790

Philip Triller was born about 1754 and was the son of William and Maria Triller. He married Mary Catherine Young and they lived in Knowlton township, Warren County, New Jersey, where their children were born and baptized in the first German and English congregation in that township.

In 1805 Philip and his wife and children left New Jersey and journeyed to Canada, where his wife’s sisters and her brother had previously settled. They travelled with three wagons, two four-horse teams and one two-horse team. The roads were so rough that it sometimes took six horses to draw one wagon over the mountainous country. They stopped at The Forty (Grimsby) and stayed near Green’s mills for a year before moving to Trafalgar Township, Halton County.

In that time Philip, with his sons and son-in-law, sawed a great quantity of lumber for building purposes, and this was floated by raft along the shore of Lake Ontario to the Twelve Mile Creek in Halton near Bronte.

Philip owned 1000 acres of land between Burlington and Bronte, and it is said built the first mills on The Sixteen. He and his wife, Catherine, lie buried in an old Burying Ground on the shore of Lake Ontario near Bronte.

Loss and Grief

Death and grief are felt in the same way throughout the world regardless of religion or race. We are unified only in birth and death.

The statuary in cemeteries is matched only by the words on stone. This verse is from All Saints Churchyard in Newtown Lindford, England:
Weep not
Dear Friends, but be content
For I to you was only lent.
In love I lived; in peace I died.
You asked my life but God denied.
Farewell, dear friends, and cease to weep.
In Christ I dwell; in Christ I sleep.

Shickluna Memorials

This memorial located in Victoria Lawn Cemetery, St. Catherines, Ontario, Canada is in remembrance of three young children. They are the offspring of Joseph & Mary Shickluna and grandchildren of the celebrated Louis Shickluna.

Myra was born and died in 1879, Thomas (Tomey) Shickluna was born in 1875 and died on 28 August 1879 from acute dysentery. Leo also died from acute dysentery a few days later on 2 Sep 1879.

The memorial shows 3 young children seated around a lamb, a common symbol on the graves of children.
Myra aged 6 months Tomey aged 4 years Leo aged 15 months
Children of Joseph & Mary Shickluna

3 of shipbuilder Louis Shlickluna's children3DSCN4179

Weep not for me, dear parents dear.
I am not dead but sleeping here.
My glass is run; My age you see.
Wait but awhile and follow me.

The patriarch of the Shickluna family in Canada was Louis Shickluna who was born in Malta in 1808 into a family of shipbuilders. He emigrated to North America disembarking in Quebec and moving to the United States where he was employed as a ship construction worker in Youngstown, New York State. In 1835 he visited his family in Malta, probably to claim his inheritance from his wealthy parents. In 1838 he moved to Ontario, Canada to pursue opportunities with the recently completed Welland Canal at St. Catharines and became one the city’s most notable citizens with a reputation of being a skilled shipbuilder, constructing over 140 vessels including snub-nosed schooners designed to make maximum use of the canal locks, barkentines, steamers and other vessels designed primarily for service on the Great Lakes. He is recognized in Canada’s Maritime History and his story is detailed in a plaque unveiled on November 29, 1979 on Yates Street, St. Catharines, Ontario.

plaque

A prominent Canadian shipbuilder, Shickluna was born in Malta, where he worked before emigrating to North America disembarking in Quebec. By 1835 he was engaged in ship construction at Youngstown, New York. Three years later, attracted by the traffic stimulated by the Welland Canal’s completion in 1833, he purchased a shipyard on the Canal at St. Catharines. Shickluna steadily expanded his operations, which contributed significantly to the commercial prosperity of the region. Between 1838 and 1880 he directed the construction of over 140 schooners, barkentines, steamers and other vessels designed primarily for service on the Great Lakes, thereby promoting the development of inland navigation in Canada. Following Shickluna’s death, his son, Joseph continued to operate the St. Catharines shipyard until 1892.

Due to failing health and rheumatoid arthritis he left the shipyard to his sons. Following his death in 1880, (he is buried in Victoria Lawn Cemetery, situated beside Welland Canal in east St. Catharines) his son, Joseph, continued to operate the St. Catharines shipyard until 1892.

bmd stc
Louis Shickluna’s grave alongside the memorial to his grandchildren who died the year prior