Tag Archives: Fife

The Sailers’ Graveyard

Inverkeithing, North Queensferry, Fife, Scotland

Within a small graveyard in the village of North Queensferry are the ruins of the Chapel of St. James which was already in existence when Robert the Bruce granted the chapel to Dunfermline Abbey in 1320. Abandoned after the Reformation it is believed to have been destroyed by Oliver Cromwell’s Parliamentarian troops in 1651. The surviving west wall of the nave contains a stone dated 1752.

When the North Queensferry Sailors’ Society became caretakers of the chapel and the burial ground that same year they built a wall around the area as identified on a marker on the exterior; This Is Done By / The Sailers In / North Ferrie / 17 52. This inscription may relate to the fact that some stone markers were imbedded into the chapel wall so that they would not be lost.

It is rumoured that the infamous grave robbers Burke and Hare visited, and that the graveyard is locked because skeletal bones are surfacing.

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St. Andrew’s Cathedral and Priory

The town of St. Andrews in Fife, Scotland, takes its name from one of Christ’s apostles, and was an important religious centre in medieval Scotland from where the bishops wielded great influence over Church and State.

The ruins of the Cathedral, at one time Scotland’s largest building, originated from a priory founded by Bishop Robert in the 12th century and was a centre of learning. Scotland’s first university was established there.

The cemetery within the ruins of the cathedral is large, spacious, well maintained and manicured. There are numerous tombstones relating to the armed services and the men who were lost during the great wars.

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Erected / By / Robert Corstorphan / In Memory Of / William Henry, His Son, / Who Was Drowned On The 1st of July  / 1839 In An Attempting To Save Another / From A Watery Grave / In The 18th Year Of His Age.

Whose Death Was The Grief Of A Fond Mother, / And The Slighted Expectations / Of An Indulgent Father / The Youth Grew Up Like A Well Watered Plant / He Shot Deep, Rose High / And Bade Fair For Manhood.

The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews is regarded worldwide as the ‘home of golf’, therefore it is not surprising that more than a few golfers are buried here.

In Memory Of / Allan Robertson / Who Died 1st Sept 1859 / Aged 44 Years.
He Was Greatly Esteemed / For His Personal Worth / And For Many Years / Was Distinguished As The / Champion Golfer / Of Scotland.
Read more about this great golfer at http://www.worldgolfhalloffame.org/allen-robertson/