Tag Archives: National Register of Historic Places

King’s Chapel Burying Ground

King’s Chapel Burying Ground on Tremont Street in Boston, Massachusetts, was dedicated in 1689 and is the oldest burying place in Boston proper. Although the cemetery is small it contains many stones going back to the 1600s. Burials ceased here in 1796.

Mark the perfect man and behold the uprights for the end of that man is peace. 1924

The cemetery is somewhat overshadowed by the church, adjacent buildings and several trees within the grounds. A bell made in England was hung in 1772 until it cracked in 1814 and was then recast by Paul Revere. It still rings before every service.

Two bronze plaques attached to the railing at the entrance of the cemetery identify some of the more famous people buried here. The burying ground was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

In the early 1800s, many of the gravestones were moved from their original position and placed in rows, so it is impossible to tell the exact location of some of the graves. In olden times a great deal of excitement was caused by a rumor that someone had been buried alive there, but the affair ended uneventfully when the doctor who had attended the deceased testified in the matter.

To him that overcometh and keepeth my work.
To the end will I give the morning star He that dwelleth in love, dwelleth in God and God in him. 1900

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Forest Hills Cemetery

Located on Forest Hills Avenue/Morton Street, Boston, MA, USA, this cemetery was founded in 1848. It is a superb example of 19th century design of a rural garden cemetery, and a cultural change from the severe style of the burial grounds in colonial New England.

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The active cemetery of 250 acres is so large that pathways have been named. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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There are numerous commissioned sculptures throughout the graveyard. The Sculpture Path was created to allow visitors a special place where they could enjoy a magnificent landscape while visiting friends and family.

The Sentinel by Fern Cunningham. This statue commemorates the artist’s African ancestors and strong women in her family.

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Removed from the Roxbury tomb in Boston Common in 1895

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Remember
Edward Mcclure Peters Jr.
First Lieutenant 16th US Infantry
Commanding Second Company Machine Gun
Battalion, First Brigade, First Division,
American Expeditionary Force
Born On Christmas Day 1892. Killed In Action
At Seicheprey In Lorraine While Trying
To Protect His Men. March 11, 1918
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In 1999, the Forest Hills Educational Trust developed the annual Lantern Festival in 1999 to remember family and friends during a moving ceremony inspired by Buddhist ritual. At dusk, people release hundreds of glowing lanterns bearing personal message onto Lake Hibiscus (located in the center of the cemetery) and watch them float away as the sun sets.

 

Copp’s Hill Burying Ground

Copp’s Hill Burying Ground which is in the North End of Boston, Massachusetts, is named after shoemaker William Copp from whom the town purchased the land. Located on a hill, it overlooks the harbour and the banks of the Charles River, and because of its height, the British used this vantage point to train their cannons on Charlestown during the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775. The epitaph on Captain Daniel Malcolm’s tombstone at Copp’s Hill is riddled with the marks of British bullets.

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As Boston’s second oldest burying ground, it contains more than 1200 marked graves and 272 tombs, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. Most of the stone markers were placed before 1825. The quality of the engravings depended on the skill of the carver and the budget of the person buying the memorial stone. In 1838 new walking paths were installed and the gravestones were arranged in rows. Consequently, many of the gravestones no longer mark the location of their owner’s grave.

O my Friends remember that the Lord giveth
& taketh away, & blessed be the name of the 
Lord. O my Husband & Children, dry up 
your tears, & remember that you must all follow 
me sooner or later, where we must all lie till Christ 
our Saviour bids us arise; for thy will must be done. Amen

80% of the gravestones have a Death’s Head carving used as a symbol of death and mortality since medieval times. Winged skulls evolved during the 18th century and reflected the Puritan religious influence.

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Winged effigies were common in the latter part of the 18th century.

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The urn is a classical symbol for death and the weeping willow is associated with mourning. These two images which are found together became popular during the American Revolution.

Example of the Urn-and-Willow Design
Example of the Urn-and-Willow Design

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Heraldic symbols and coats of arms are also found on headstones within the grounds. The tomb of William Clark, seen here, was later taken by Samuel Winslow, who had his name carved on the gravestone.

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Here Lyes The Mortal Part/ Of / William Clark Esq. The legend is almost illegible describing Clark as An Honorable Counsellor for the Province, and A Despiser of Sorry Persons and Little Actions.